maxresdefault[1].jpg

Manic is my thunder in the distance. I can tell when I am about to enter the dreaded manic state. With me it’s never harmful or aggressive toward another or myself. My manic state tells me to keep moving, stay busy, don’t think too much and don’t feel too much. And I don’t. I get a lot of things done around the house. I paint and love it. I just painted my living room and bedroom. I feel so accomplished.

It’s certainly not like that for eveyone who has Bipolar 1 which is the worst of the different levels of Bipolar. I feel fortunate that I am productive during those times. When I run out of things to do, sometimes I go shopping or just do something to get out of the house. I love to garden and keep up my yard. Plant flowers and just enjoy the beauty I create.

What’s a manic episode?
A manic episode is a mood state characterized by period of at least one week where an elevated, expansive, or unusually irritable mood exists. A person experiencing a manic episode is usually engaged in significant goal-directed activity beyond their normal activities. And that’s where I geet into trouble. I have to have projects to work on so I stay pretty active and civil. After years of dealing with the manic side which for me lasts sometimes months.

The symptoms of mania include: elevated mood, inflated self-esteem, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, difficulty maintaining attention, increase in goal-directed activity, and excessive involvement in pleasurable activities. These manic symptoms significantly impact a person’s daily living.
Another definition of manic is someone or something that shows wild and unrestrained enthusiasm, to the point of being in a frenzied state. A person jumping and dancing around with intense excitement is an example of someone who might be described as manic.

Sometimes the manic mood is more irritable than it is elevated, especially if the person’s wishes are curtailed or denied altogether. Often a person in the midst of mania will engage in multiple projects at the same time, with little premeditation or thought going into them, and finishing none of them. They may work on these projects at all hours of the day, with little regard for sleep or rest.

A person’s change in mood is typically associated with manic symptoms that should be observable by others (e.g., friends or relatives of the individual) and must be uncharacteristic of the individual’s usual state or behavior. In other words, they’re acting in a way that isn’t typical of themselves, and other people recognize it.

The manic feelings the person experiences should be severe enough to cause difficulty or impairment in their ability to function at work, with friends or family, at school, or other important areas in their life. Symptoms also cannot be the result of substance use or abuse (e.g., alcohol, drugs, medications) or caused by a general medical condition.

In order for a manic episode to be diagnosed, three (3) or more of the following symptoms must be present:
Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
Decreased need for sleep (e.g., one feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)
More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking
Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
Attention is easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant items
Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school; or sexually) or psychomotor agitation
Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)

Specific Symptoms of a Manic Episode
In order for a manic episode to be diagnosed, three (3) or more of the following symptoms must be present:
Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
Decreased need for sleep (e.g., one feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)
More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking
Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
Attention is easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant items
Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school; or sexually) or psychomotor agitation
Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)
Increased energy, activity, and restlessness
Excessively “high,” overly good, euphoric mood
Extreme irritability
Racing thoughts and talking very fast, jumping from one idea to another
Distractibility, can’t concentrate well
Little sleep needed
Unrealistic beliefs in one’s abilities and powers
Poor judgment
Spending sprees
A lasting period of behavior that is different from usual
Increased sexual drive
Abuse of drugs, particularly cocaine, alcohol, and sleeping medications
Provocative, intrusive, or aggressive behavior
Denial that anything is wrong

Advertisements